Under the Maple Canopy

Singing Union Songs Since 2009

Thursday Sweet

6 Comments

I almost never make a recipe exactly as it is written. I usually cut the sugar (often significantly), mess with the seasonings, and otherwise run roughshod all over the recipe until my husband reminds me that what I’ve made is similar to the written recipe in name only. Ninety-nine percent of the time I think what I made was far better than the original. The other one percent of the time, I figure I need to make a few more changes. It’s also not unusual for me to start making a recipe before veering off in a completely different direction. I cook like I do just about everything else – flying by the seat of my pants, born on the winds of inspiration, and otherwise distracted by fairy Band-Aids.

Fairy band-aids? Oh, yes, when my daughter is throwing a fit in Target, all we have to do is make our way to the back of the store and swing down the first aid aisle. Band-Aid makes a Disney Fairies version. Once she catches sight of them, all else is forgotten. It’s actually quite useful (and cheap). I don’t have to buy any, she just has to see them. I suppose in a way it’s a wonder I get anything done.


This recipe for Harvest Spice Cookies is one of the exceptions. I made the recipe exactly as it was written and they were perfect right out of the oven. Well, the ones baked on my USA Pan were perfectly golden brown on the bottom without being over crisped on the top. See the nice browning on the middle cookie? Perfect. The ones on my Pampered Chef stoneware? Meh.

I used to be a Pampered Chef consultant and I used to believe that stoneware was the best, but it’s not. Nope. There is no contest, no question, no doubt. USA Pans are heavy-duty, non-stick (and non-PFOA) wonders. They’re made in the United States (a rarity these days) and if you’re buying from the King Arthur Flour website or the Williams & Sonoma catalog, you’ll find USA Pans prominently featured in their pages.

The last time I was at a Pampered Chef party the consultant was telling us all about their metal baking pans and how wonderful and unique they were. She crowed that there was nothing like them on the market. If you would have been at the party with me I would have looked at you and shook my head ever so slightly. No, Pampered Chef consultant, there is no contest. My USA Pan will leave yours off in the cookie crumb dust*. For the record, with all of the many (many!) places you can buy kitchen goods these days, it’s a wonder Pampered Chef is still in business. Dearest reader, you can buy better elsewhere.

You can’t find a more prefect fall cookie recipe elsewhere, though. Well, maybe you can. I mean, there are like 1,000,000 cookie recipes out there so statistically speaking you probably could.

Hmmmm….I should probably make some more cookies.

*As always I don’t get paid by anyone to write or recommend what I do. If I write about it, it’s because that’s what struck my fancy and that’s what I really like. Believe me, if they were paying me, you’d find my kitchen cabinets full of USA Pans and a nanny watching my children while I wrote.

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6 thoughts on “Thursday Sweet

  1. I think I will have to try this recipe. Thanks for the link to the pans.

  2. Love this post, I too begin with a recipe and wind up changing it to suit my taste. A few years ago a friend gave me a pampered chef stone pan, I couldn’t stand the feel of it and could not imagine putting food on it, since I like to recycle and reuse it makes a great tray under a few small flower pots.

    • What a neat way to recycle the pan! I re-gifted a set of knives we received for a wedding gift many moons ago. My mother-in-law just raved over the knives and how wonderful she thought they were. I picked one up and the texture they put on the metal handle made my skin crawl. It was terrible – so I completely understand the texture thing.

  3. Aye. I have to agree with making the recipe my own thing. I don’t usually follow a recipe letter for letter, either. The cookies look delicious. I’ll have to try that, myself.

    Thank you,

    Naia.